The Geoffrey Barrow Award

The Barrow Award was established in 2014 while Jenny Wormald was chair. The intention was to create a large research grant, up to £2,500, which would last for four years, to support projects within the broad areas covered by the Conference of Scottish Medievalists. Elizabeth Ewan initially suggested that it be named in memory of Professor Geoffrey Barrow, which was warmly endorsed by the society. Details of projects this award funded will be added below in the coming months.


Geoffrey Barrow (28 November 1924 – 14 December 2013)

Geoffrey Wallis Barrow was born to Marjorie Stuart and Captain Charles Embleton Barrow, later adding Steuart to his name. He attained a degree in history at the University of St Andrews, although this was interrupted by service in WWII. While undertaking a BLitt at the University of Oxford he met fellow historian Archie Duncan, and in 1958 they were among the fifteen founding members of the Scottish Medievalists. Barrow held appointments at University College, London, King’s College, University of Durham, the University of St Andrews, and the University of Edinburgh before retiring in 1992. He applied an exceptional understanding of documentary sources, as well as linguistics and geography, to medieval Scotland, generating works which remain foundational for scholars of the subject. These include Robert Bruce and the Community of the Realm (1965), The Anglo-Norman Era in Scottish History (1980), and his editions of Regesta Regum Scottorum (1960, 1971). Barrow’s work placed medieval Scotland, with its melting pot of cultures, within a wider European context. He married Heather Lownie in 1951.

Sources

Hector MacQueen, ‘Geoffrey Wallis Steuart Barrow, 1924–2013: a memoir’, The Innes Review 65:1 (2014), pp. 1-12; Dauvit Broun, ‘Barrow, Geoffrey Wallis Steuart (1924–2013)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (2017); David Torrance, ‘Professor Geoffrey BarrowThe Herald (2013).

Morvern French, May 2022

AWARDS

REPORTED TO THE 2021 CONFERENCE

Cynthia Neville (Dalhousie): ‘The Lives of the Leges Marchiarum’

Margaret Connolly and Rachel Hart (St Andrews): ‘Identifying Early Scottish Notaries Database: Progress in a year of Covid’

REPORTED TO THE 2020 CONFERENCE

Martin MacGregor (University of Glasgow), ‘The skull of Robert Bruce’

Jack McLachlan (University of Maine/St Andrews), ‘Mapping Fife’s Medieval Waterscape’

Adrián Maldonado (NMS) & Alex Sanmark (University of the Highlands and Islands), ‘Monumental literacy and the making of Scotland, AD 400–1200’

REPORTSED TO THE 2019 CONFERENCE

Alice Taylor (King’s College London) ‘Identifying Governmental Forms in Europe, 1100–1300’

Lucinda Dean (University of the Highlands and Islands) ‘The Perth Charterhouse Project: Initial Explorations’

REPORTED TO THE 2018 CONFERENCE

Cynthia Neville (Dalhousie University):‘Wrongdoing and remission: canonical influences on royal pardon in later medieval Scotland’

Claire Hawes (University of Aberdeen):‘Privilege and privacy: corporate politics in Renaissance Scotland, 1469–1542’

Giovanna Guidicini (Glasgow School of Art): ‘Iconography of Stirling Castle façade’                    

Catherine McMillan: ‘“Zeal and charity”: Scottish charitable giving in support of Geneva and the common cause of Protestantism’

REPORTED TO THE 2017 CONFERENCE

Michael Penman (University of Stirling): ‘Dunfermline project’

Katy Jack (University of Stirling): ‘The earldom of Mar’

Edda Frankot (University of Aberdeen):‘The Scottish translations of the Laws of Oleron’

William Hepburn (University of Aberdeen):‘Medieval burgh registers’

Miles Kerr-Peterson (University of Glasgow) ‘Marischal College, Dunnottar Castle and Thomas Cargill’